After the delay of the Spy­ro Reignit­ed Tril­o­gy, it seems the hype for this game died down a bit. Espe­cial­ly since it launched right after huge AAA titles released in Octo­ber, when it was sup­posed to be out back in Sep­tem­ber. How­ev­er, don’t be so quick to push it aside.

I’ve played these three titles since their launch­es back in the day and always com­plete it as ful­ly as it will allow. I’ve played them every year, as a tra­di­tion to the games I spent hours play­ing as a kid. So, nat­u­ral­ly, I was wor­ried any changes that were made would ruin the emo­tions attached. My expec­ta­tion were high and, thank­ful­ly, I wasn’t dis­ap­point­ed. 

Spyro Reignited Trilogy Review

For any­one out there that’s nev­er played Spy­ro, it might appear to look like a sil­ly child’s game not worth the time to play. Those who know and love Spy­ro, will deeply appre­ci­ate how these remakes were han­dled. New play­ers, be it chil­dren or adults, can take advan­tage of learn­ing the slight­ly mod­i­fied mechan­ics.  

At first, I noticed how beau­ti­ful the upgrad­ed worlds looked. The peo­ple over at Toys for Bob did an amaz­ing job reimag­in­ing each area, char­ac­ters and all the fine details, like gems, trea­sure chests, por­tals, etc. All the col­ors are vibrant, but doesn’t cause strain on the eyes and the art-style gives off that old Spy­ro feel. 

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In fact, in Spy­ro the Drag­on (first title), all the crys­tal­ized drag­ons have char­ac­ter­is­tics asso­ci­at­ed with their home worlds. For exam­ple, an Arti­san drag­on looks like an artist. They’re painters, sculp­tors, bak­ers… it def­i­nite­ly gives them more of a per­son­al­i­ty, as they don’t just look like blocks with slight col­or changes.All the char­ac­ters from Ripto’s Rage and Year of the Drag­on, have new­ly updat­ed mod­els. They’re exact­ly what I imag­ined they would be in on the lat­est con­sole gen­er­a­tion. 

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While the sights are spec­tac­u­lar, the audio is just above aver­age. The updat­ed songs still hold that Spy­ro funk, but the slight tweaks can sound odd to the ear. There is a set­ting to change music back to the orig­i­nal sound­track. The voice actors for the Reignit­ed Tril­o­gy did an excel­lent job with all the char­ac­ters. Each one felt famil­iar, but was dif­fer­ent and unique from the orig­i­nals. 

Spyro Reignited Trilogy Review

Mechan­i­cal­ly, it plays slight­ly dif­fer­ent than before. The jump­ing, glid­ing, and charg­ing have much smoother motions. It actu­al­ly took me a bit to get used to the tiny adjust­ments, but they’re actu­al­ly great. You can also use R2 (PS4) to breathe fire instead of cir­cle, which makes it eas­i­er to defeat ene­mies. 

Spyro Reignited Trilogy Review

Aside from all the improve­ments, every­thing in these games is exact­ly as it was before. Place­ment of gems and trea­sure chests, dia­log, cutscenes (more or less) and area lay­outs, are the same. It’s hon­est­ly sur­pris­ing how on point these are. The dev team stayed as close to the orig­i­nals as pos­si­ble and it real­ly payed off.

Spyro Reignited Trilogy Review

Bottom Line

If you’ve played the three orig­i­nal Spy­ros’ in the series, you’ll appre­ci­ate the care tak­en into remak­ing these titles. Each one has nos­tal­gia writ­ten all over it, bring­ing up all of those spe­cial feel­ings you had as a kid. If you’ve nev­er played it, give it a try. It might be sim­ple, but it’s real­ly fun and not over­ly time con­sum­ing. Con­sid­er­ing you get all three updat­ed titles for one price, it’s prac­ti­cal­ly a steal. So don’t hes­i­tate to bring Spy­ro Reignit­ed Tril­o­gy to your col­lec­tion, as you shouldn’t wor­ry whether it will hold its own against the ear­li­er series.